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Wednesday, June 20, 2012

The Geology Of Fathers

Daily Draw: Tarot of the Origins ~ King of Cups

I'm reading a book from a science series published in 1925, the same year my father was born. About how the crust of earth was formed over the eons and each page I read makes me think of my dad. He was both avid reader and rock hound and everywhere we went you'd see him picking up rocks, often licking them to see the color and grain (it's a rock hound thing...) and would show and teach me earth history, for instance while standing on the scrape marks in the Canadian Precambrian Shield that were made by rock being moved across it during the ice age.

I'm reminded by this card to wonder, what would any of us have become if we were single and educated rather than married with children and the bindings of a day job to feed clothe and shelter a family. I think my dad would have become a great geologist, my father-in-law a great inventor or architect. And I wouldn't have become at all.

Me and dad, 1962ish, Athabasca Falls, Jasper Park, Alberta Canada

"Apart from its healthful mental training as a branch of ordinary education, geology as an open air pursuit affords an admirable training in habits of observation, furnishes a delightful relief from the cares and routine of everyday life, takes us into the open fields and the free fresh face of nature, leads us into all manner of sequestered nooks, whither hardly any other occupation or interest would be likely to send us, sets before us problems of the highest interest regarding the history of the ground beneath our feet, and thus gives a new charm to scenery which may be already replete with attractions." ~ Sir Archibald Geikie 1835-1924 'Outlines of Field Geology' 1900

5 comments:

  1. Blogger :( I don't know why two images makes the background of the script look funny. Or why the spacing triples... It did it Sunday also and I retyped it all, not going there today...

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  2. I bet your dad was a big John Muir fan. :) I'm reading his biography, and while I knew he was a huge proponent of conservation and lover of trees and mountains, I didn't realize all the extensive research he did of glaciers.

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  3. Fixed the background by going into HTML mode, but I doubt I'll be adding two images to a post anytime soon.


    Come west one day and travel through Muir country. Gorgeous. I have several posters of his paintings and rotate them out in my entry area.


    Thanks for stopping by!

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  4. Lovely to see you reading with a deck I confess I find difficult. And that lovely photo; my parents were in Canada in 1962 and have photos of this same tone, maybe your paths crossed...

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  5. Good morning Roger, thanks for stopping by. Difficult decks are my meat and potatoes :)

    Origins is a great deck for my blog, but I think the only time I'd use it for reading for other is if their focus was related to family in some way. If they wanted to know if X read their text I can only see this deck picking up a bone and whacking them upside the head..

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I welcome your thoughts. Good bad or indifferent; opinions are the lifeblood of conversation and I always learn something from anyone with a new point of view. Thank you for visiting, Sharyn