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Thursday, October 27, 2016

Thousands, Nay Millions

Daily Draw: Animals Divine Tarot ~ Page of Wands/Insects

We once had an invasion of ladybugs, we could scrape them off the front of the house with a shovel. Our annual insect problem is with Boxelder bugs. Black with pretty orange stripes. We never see them until the cool weather sets in then a hot day comes. The front of our house with its south facing windows then attracts them like a magnet. And I mow the lawn before 10 AM, after that the neighbors honey bees come work our clover.

All that said to say, I miss a lot of what goes on around me. Reading Beaks, Bones and Bird Songs last week, bats eat 600 to a 1000 bugs in an hour, swallows scoop up 3-400 in short order for their hatchlings. How can so many bugs be in the air and me not see them. Perhaps I'm just lucky that way....

"It's a bug-eat-bug world out there, Princess. One of those "circle of life" kind of things." ~ Hopper  A Bug's Life 1998

7 comments:

  1. As long as you're not eaten alive by them I wouldn't miss seeing them that much. But I can imagine how hard it must be when the world around you fades little by little...
    Hugs

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    1. I don't think I saw them before either :) but I am unreasonably afraid of moths. Weird

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    2. Oh lord I hate moths. I swear an enormous one flew down my boot once and bit me. My home full of moth deterrents. I can put up with many insects but not ones that bite my ankles and eat my clothes.

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  2. I saw on the news last night of a new bug that has infested the citrus groves of Florida, decimating the trees. Orange juice may become so expensive it will be served up like champagne. It will take some real Page of Wands ingenuity to figure out to solve that problem.

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    1. thousands upon thousands of Italy's olive trees are dying too. If you are buying Italian olive oil, you probably aren't.

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  3. That sounds like a book I'd enjoy. I think the ladybugs look at homes as caves to overwinter in (their natural behavior). Don't know anything about box elder bugs. :)

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    1. I liked the first half, skimmed the second half

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I welcome your thoughts. Good bad or indifferent; opinions are the lifeblood of conversation and I always learn something from anyone with a new point of view. Thank you for visiting, Sharyn