Sunday, October 18, 2020

Got Bloat?

 Wild Medicine Deck ~ Fennel

foeniculum vulgare. Sounds vaguely dirty doesn't it? 

This week with the Wild Medicine Deck is bound to be all over the place, just how deeply can I mine herbs anyway? But I have zero doubt I'll learn something, perhaps be encouraged to try something new. We are pretty simple cooks. Salt, Pepper, chives, an occasional lash out with thyme on a turkey. and Johnny's on my hard boiled eggs. Exciting innit it? I had to make my spell check accept innit...now legally a word. Pretty soon I'll be saying the shovel is up agin the wall and I'll put the sparagrass on to cook. Maybe followed by an expresso. Our 'roots' are never far from us in the end. 

Fennel is of the carrot family, originally found around the Mediterranean, now common worldwide, a medical herbal for indigestion, bloating and heartburn. Rob has completely reworked the garden area this fall, perhaps I'll mark off a bit of it for a kitchen plot?

6 comments:

  1. Fennel is the one that tastes kinda like licorice? Never liked licorice, you can have mine. I just got a couple of books from library on herbalism. It will interesting to see the cards you pull this week.

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    1. you look it up and tell us both. I'm thinking more oniony, but that doesn't sound like bloat remedy, and it can be used for tea. Anise is what black licorice flavor is from and I don't like it either. Always throw away the black jellybeans :)

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  2. We have dog fennel here (not a herb but a weed) named for the way it smells. :)
    An herb garden sounds like a delightful project.

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    1. a fun new idea! although so many herbs self seed radically. I will certainly think about it there is plenty of room.

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  3. I like Sweet Fennel and also bronze fennel plants as I like the licorice flavor. Bad: Both are on the Washington State list of noxious weeds. Good: Both are loved by swallowtail butterflies.

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    1. when I say I'll think about it, translate that to I'll have Rob think about it :) Many plants are considered noxious here because we have perfect growing jungle conditions. Loosestrife Gooseneck is a good example. For 25 years my small patch lived in the far end of the flower bed. Had to survive on its own, and it did, in just the right amount. But two years ago we changed the bed and moved the Gooseneck up to the bank close to the house so it got water and love along with the roses. Error. Error. We may have to burn it out.

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I welcome your thoughts. Good bad or indifferent; opinions are the lifeblood of conversation and I always learn something from a new point of view. Thank you for visiting, Sharyn